Marine and farmed fish on the Polish market: Comparison of the nutritive value and human exposure to PCDD/Fs and other contaminants

Marine and farmed fish on the Polish market: Comparison of the nutritive value and human exposure to PCDD/Fs and other contaminants

Joanna Szlinder-Richert Corresponding Author Contact InformationE-mail The Corresponding Author, Zygmunt Usydus, Małgorzata Malesa-Ciećwierz, Lucyna Polak-Juszczak, Wiesława Ruczyńska

National Marine Fisheries Research Institute, Department of Food and Environmental Chemistry, 1 Kołłataja Str., 81-332 Gdynia, Poland

Received 17 February 2011; revised 5 September 2011; Accepted 22 September 2011. Available online 18 October 2011.

 

Abstract

Chemical analyses were performed in nine fish species that are popular on the Polish market. These included Baltic fish (cod, herring, salmon), fish farmed in Poland (carp, trout), marine fish imported from China (Alaska pollock, sole), and farmed fish imported from Vietnam and China (sutchi catfish, tilapia). The nutritional composition (amino acid, micro- and macronutrients, fat-soluble vitamins – A1, D3, E) and certain contaminants (organochlorine pesticides, OCPs; indicator polychlorinated biphenyl, PCB6; polychlorinated dibenzo-paradioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans, PCDD/Fs; dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls, dl-PCBs; organotin compounds, OCTs; dyes, malachite green and crystal violet; veterinary drug residues, nitrofurans and chloramphenicol; toxic metals, Cd, Pb, Hg) in the muscle tissues of fish were determined. It was confirmed that the fish species analyzed were excellent sources of amino acids, and were rich in phosphorous and selenium. Baltic Sea fish (salmon, herring), fish farmed in Poland (carp and trout), and tilapia were also rich in vitamin D3.

Traces of OCP, PCB6, OCT, dyes, veterinary drug residues, and heavy metals were detected in concentrations which do not pose a threat to consumers at the current rate of fish consumption in Poland. However, the problem might arise from the content of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in fatty Baltic fish. The fish species analyzed, differed in their nutritional values and degrees of contamination. We suggest that for optimum health and safety, it is advisable that consumers include a variety of different fish species in their diets.

 

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